TCDC & Ed Tech Monthly Workshop and Events Calendar

TCDC and Ed Tech now have a monthly workshop and events calendar! You can view the calendar by visiting https://iweb.langara.bc.ca/tcdc/calendar/ where you will find full workshop and event listings and locations as well as the link to register.
– Hope to see you soon!

p.s. Older TCDC registration and EdTech registration forms maintained until March.

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TCDC Book Club: Make It Stick

Would you like to find out how to help your students (and yourself) learn more effectively and increase knowledge retention? Would you like to discover some new learning and practice strategies that can be applied right away in your class?

In Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning, two psychologists and a storyteller, Henry Roediger, Mark McDaniel and Peter Brown, share how recent research in cognitive science can be applied to improve educational practice. Join the TCDC book club this Spring to explore and unpack common myths about learning and discover how information retrieval, varying one’s practice, embracing difficulties, and accurately assessing one’s knowledge can make the information and skills we are learning truly stick.

Register Now

This book club will be facilitated by a TCDC curriculum consultant and discussions will focus on ways participants might implement some of the strategies outlined in the book to make learning stick in their own courses. We hope you will join us this semester for thought-provoking reading, delicious snacks, and great conversation about teaching and learning.

We will be discussing one chapter each week, beginning with the first chapter on Wednesday, January 23, 2018 from 4:30pm-5:30pm in TCDC (C210).

Note: The Teaching and Curriculum Development Centre has a few copies of the book that book club participants are welcome to borrow on a first come first served basis.

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Maximizing Student Engagement through Classroom Configuration

Whenever I walk into a classroom to deliver a class or a workshop, I contemplate what I want the students or participants to do, and as such, will I need to reconfigure the classroom space to be conducive for the learning activities I have planned? Do I want to move the classroom furniture around, and if so, how will I situate the desks and chairs? Or, does the default setting (i.e., rows and columns) actually work best for my planned lesson?

Learn more about how to use classroom configurations to maximize student engagement by joining our upcoming workshop.

Considering that most institutions require furniture to be put back exactly as it was found, many instructors may not want to take time to move desks around if, in 50 minutes, they have to move them back (tip – get your students to help with this task!). While default layouts can certainly be conducive to learning, there are other seating arrangements that may work better for your classroom context, making that bit of time to move things worth the initial effort.

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Langarans Exploring Pedagogy – B means Bold

In Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar, Langara instructors write a fictional story in the first person, highlighting, “some kind of ‘problem’, or challenge, or dilemma, or puzzlement” they have experienced in their teaching practice. The “story will, at some level, be a partial description of the landscape of good teaching (even if the teaching in the story itself isn’t – on the face of it – seen as ‘good’). A story is a snapshot of what good-and-improving teachers sometimes experience in their practice.” Woven informally into each story are the concepts and phrases pulled from various assigned course readings (see references).

For more information about the Advanced Teaching Seminar or to inquire about registering, e-mail Carolyn Wing, Educational Development Coordinator at TCDC (tcdc@langara.ca).

      B means Bold

BCAP (Business Computer Applications) is a course that teaches students the functions of Microsoft Office software. The course outline (BCAP course outline 2005) required the students to purchase a $130 Microsoft Office textbook and explore the chapters on Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint tools; the textbook was a good reference though the publication was outdated. Technology plays an important part of education and business; however, current and accurate references online seemed like a better investment than purchasing a $130 textbook.          

While reviewing the course outcomes, evaluation tools and rubrics, I was reminded I want to leave the students with tools and techniques they can apply in the working world, and I want to teach with this in mind.

Having taught the BCAP course once with the textbook, I knew I wanted to explore another way to show how these software tools could be used in the context of business. I knew the students understood that B means Bold and they were ready for answers to why, where and how they could explore uses for Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint software tools.

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TCDC Workshop: The Expert Blind Spot

“Knowing something and teaching something are two different somethings” – Kevin Tumlinson

Following a term of what felt like a teaching rut, I started to examine what was behind this change, and I realized I was falling into the same trap that caught me when I first started teaching. When most of us start as instructors, we are fresh out of graduate school and keen to ignite the passion of our discipline in our students. For myself, before I knew it, I was knee deep into my very first class with 15 years worth of knowledge in my field, but limited training on how to teach it to first year students. In my first few years developing courses, I found myself including too much content that was way above the capacity of my students. It took me a good five years or so before I understood the balance between the content and the instructional strategies to give students enough practice to learn that content. Fast-forward another ten years and add some intentional research into andragogical principles, and I was in the sweet spot. I was no longer focused on teaching content, instead I was teaching students, and to my surprise it was working!

However, this didn’t last. In recent years, I have found myself thinking things like – why don’t my students know this by now? Or, they should already be able to do this type of assignment, and it sure is taking them a long time to finish this in class task. I even found myself adding extra content for fear that the course had become too boring or too easy. On my last course surveys, I was dismayed to hear that students were struggling, and that their main issue was that there was a lot to know, but not enough time to know it. So I was back at square one, with a lot of content and not enough emphasis on learning.

Why was this happening?

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TCDC and EdTech Teaching Innovation Series

TCDC and EdTech  Teaching Innovation Series

Whether you’re new to teaching or have decades of experience, we can help you keep up with the constantly changing field of education.

 Would you like to

  • ensure your materials are accessible to all learners or find ways to make classes more active?
  • learn abut Lynda.com, BrightSpace tools, or embedding videos?   
  • find out about supporting intercultural competency in the classroom
  • Indigenize your curriculum but aren’t sure where to start?

Consider taking one of the many TCDC/EdTech offered workshops

 Complete 6 sessions before June 2019 and receive a certificate of completion in Teaching Innovation at a celebratory luncheon.

 Register for sessions at: https://iweb.langara.bc.ca/tcdc/calendar/

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Langaran’s Exploring Pedagogy -Registration Open Now

Registration Open Now for the next session of Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar!

If you are an experienced Langara instructor interested in exploring the practice of teaching and in reflecting deeply on your own pedagogy, then Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar will be of interest to you.

The Advanced Teaching Seminar (ATS) was piloted through 2015-17 as an initiative of the Learning and Teaching APAG. It will be hosted this year by TCDC and is now seeking interested faculty.

What are the benefits? What will you gain by joining the ATS? Here is one participant’s personal reflection:

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TCDC Book Club: How Learning Works

Ever wondered how students’ prior knowledge (or misunderstandings)
and the ways they organize new information impact their learning? Curious about what factors motivate students to learn? Want to know more about which types of practice and feedback actually enhance learning, or how you can help your students become self-directed learners?

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Langarans Exploring Pedagogy – Melissa’s Mea Culpa

Langarans Reflect on Pedagogy

In Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar, Langara instructors write a fictional story in the first person, highlighting, “some kind of ‘problem’, or challenge, or dilemma, or puzzlement” they have experienced in their teaching practice. The “story will, at some level, be a partial description of the landscape of good teaching (even if the teaching in the story itself isn’t – on the face of it – seen as ‘good’). A story is a snapshot of what good-and-improving teachers sometimes experience in their practice.” Woven informally into each story are the concepts and phrases pulled from various assigned course readings (see references).

For more information about the Advanced Teaching Seminar or to inquire about registering, e-mail Carolyn Wing, Educational Development Coordinator at TCDC (tcdc@langara.ca).

               Melissa’s Mea Culpa

In the summer of 2017 I was given the opportunity to return to SFU and teach one of my most favourite classes – CRIM 315: Restorative Justice. First, a bit of history. This course was taught to me in my undergrad by an amazing professor who gave me the opportunity to connect my head to my heart, to explore intellectual honesty, exemplified “walking her talk”, and who was teaching about being vulnerable (CoP Document) before Brene Brown made it famous. The late Dr. Elizabeth (Liz) Elliott taught with her full heart and through her story-telling (Course Description), created a safe space for students to explore the intricacies of an incredibly complex justice system.

I then moved on to graduate school and under Liz’s supervision, became one of the teaching assistants for restorative justice. On two separate occasions, . . .

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Langaran’s Exploring Pedagogy -My Telos Meets Another Tribe

Langarans Reflect on Pedagogy

In Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar, Langara instructors write a fictional story in the first person, highlighting, “some kind of ‘problem’, or challenge, or dilemma, or puzzlement” they have experienced in their teaching practice. The “story will, at some level, be a partial description of the landscape of good teaching (even if the teaching in the story itself isn’t – on the face of it – seen as ‘good’). A story is a snapshot of what good-and-improving teachers sometimes experience in their practice.” Woven informally into each story are the concepts and phrases pulled from various assigned course readings (see references).
For more information about the Advanced Teaching Seminar or to inquire about registering, e-mail Carolyn Wing, Educational Development Coordinator at TCDC (tcdc@langara.ca).

Every Discipline had a Telos. 

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Making Sense of Open Education – cross Canada mini-MOOC

From June 1-15, 2018, a cross-Canada mini-MOOC (massive open online course) called Making Sense of Open Education will take place through the OpenLearn UK Moodle platform. The course will consist of short daily lessons and activities at an introductory level. The purpose of the course is to increase awareness and use of open educational resources (OER) as part of post-secondary teaching and learning in Canada.

Topics will include OER, open educational practices (OEP), copyright and the Creative Commons licenses, and open tools for adaptation. A variety of experienced open educators, and friends from global regions will participate and support learning and sharing opportunities.

Daily lessons will take approximately 30 minutes to complete with a targeted (and hopefully fun) daily practice opportunity to apply what you are learning. The course team and others that have already signed up look forward to your participation.

There is no cost to participate in the course. The full set of course modules will be made available on the course front page June 1 for you to download, save, and adapt as you desire if you prefer to take the course in a self-directed way.

Questions? Please contact Jenni via email: jhayman@ecampusontario.ca

Registration is Open at the Following Link: https://bit.ly/2EV3FHV

Jenni Hayman
Program Manager
eCampusOntario
226.500.0845

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Langaran’s Exploring Pedagogy – CSI Style

In Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar, Langara instructors write a fictional story in the first person, highlighting, “some kind of ‘problem’, or challenge, or dilemma, or puzzlement”[1] they have experienced in their teaching practice. The “story will, at some level, be a partial description of the landscape of good teaching (even if the teaching in the story itself isn’t – on the face of it – seen as ‘good’).  A story is a snapshot of what good-and-improving teachers sometimes experience in their practice.”[2] Woven informally into each story are the concepts and phrases pulled from various assigned course readings (see references). 

For more information about the Advanced Teaching Seminar or to inquire about registering, e-mail Carolyn Wing, Educational Development Coordinator at TCDC (tcdc@langara.ca).

[1] Musson, 2017.
[2] Musson, 2017.

Our first submission: Richard’s CSI Story…….

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Bridging Indigenous Ways of Knowing with Western Ways of Doing Research – Event at Science World

Bridging Indigenous Ways of Knowing with Western Ways of Doing Research

This panel discussion will aim to bridge Western ways of knowing with Indigenous ways of knowing and will be open to a wider audience interested in science as well as visiting students, SBQMI faculty, staff, and students. The moderator of the panel will be Dr. Sam Rocha, Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Education at the Faculty of Education at UBC. Dr. Rocha’s research interests include, among others, the philosophy of race and education as well as higher education and leadership.

WWEST is partially funding this as a part of our Funding Partners Program.

Date: April 9, Time: 3:00pm-5:00pm
Cost: Free.
Location: Science World at TELUS World of Science
1455 Quebec Street
Vancouver, BC V6A 3Z7
Register: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/bridging-indigenous-ways-of-knowing-with-western-ways-of-doing-research-tickets-44202459747

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What cognitive level do your exams target?

by Kristie Dukewich & Carmen Larsen, Curriculum Consultants at TCDC
Hand completing a multiple choice exam.

Exam by Alberto G.

Before I taught my first course, I thought that preparing an exam for students was going to be easier than preparing a class lecture. I expected that exam week was going to be my easiest week in terms of course prep. I did not expect that I’d have to develop a whole new set of skills related to designing assessment. So much for expectations.

Designing effective exams has turned out to be much more complicated and time-consuming than I first imagined. There are so many variables to consider in designing an effective exam, including:

  • writing questions that are clear and concise using simple, accessible language
  • selecting specific topics to assess (and deciding which topics can be left out)
  • assessing a range of cognitive complexities

One of the aspects of exam design that I have wrestled with a lot over the years is cognitive complexity. How do I write exam questions that are challenging to students, but not too challenging? How can I assess higher-order thinking without destroying students’ confidence and motivation with overly-difficult questions?

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Are you interested in learning more about designing exams and evaluating their effectiveness? Sign-up for our workshop.

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Learning taxonomies can be incredibly valuable for helping us think about the issue of cognitive complexity in assessments. A variety of learning taxonomies have been developed that attempt to categorize levels of knowledge and/or ability. Bloom’s Taxonomy (see Krathwohl, 2002 for an overview) is probably the most well-known. It identifies a range of learner skills and abilities that are anchored by a foundation of basic knowledge of a topic. The model is hierarchical, with the level of understanding (or cognitive processing) becoming increasingly complex as we move through the 6 stages from the basic ability to recall information to the ability to analyze and evaluate it and then finally using it to create something new. This taxonomy can be very helpful when considering the types of questions we will use in our exams.

Bloom's Taxonomy Pyramid

Bloom’s Taxonomy by Center for Teaching Vanderbilt University CC2.0

However, one of the problems with Bloom’s Taxonomy is that it implies the development Continue reading

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Reflections of an Emergency Hire

Emily Gawlick-Mlieczko, Executive Director of Early Childhood Educators of BC (ECEBC), was a recent emergency hire in Langara’s Early Childhood Education Program.

Finding Inspiration When You Didn’t Know You Were Looking for It

The most amazing thing happened to me this past summer, something that confirmed the career choice I made. Don’t get me wrong—I am continually in awe and inspired by the people I meet daily through my work with ECEBC. But this was different, something I needed and I didn’t even realize it at the time.

This past summer I was hired by Langara College to teach two courses and supervise practicums. Talk about being thrown out of my comfort zone! I am used to being the student, not the instructor, and there were so many new things to learn: creating lesson plans, lectures, and assignments; meeting new colleagues; and remember­ing all the new student names. It honestly felt like the first week of September in child care with all the new faces and anticipation.

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