TCDC & Ed Tech Monthly Workshop and Events Calendar

TCDC and Ed Tech now have a monthly workshop and events calendar! You can view the calendar by visiting https://iweb.langara.bc.ca/tcdc/calendar/ where you will find full workshop and event listings and locations as well as the link to register.
– Hope to see you soon!

p.s. Older TCDC registration and EdTech registration forms maintained until March.

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TCDC and EdTech Teaching Innovation Series

TCDC and EdTech  Teaching Innovation Series

Whether you’re new to teaching or have decades of experience, we can help you keep up with the constantly changing field of education.

 Would you like to

  • ensure your materials are accessible to all learners or find ways to make classes more active?
  • learn abut Lynda.com, BrightSpace tools, or embedding videos?   
  • find out about supporting intercultural competency in the classroom
  • indigenize your curriculum but aren’t sure where to start?

Consider taking one of the many TCDC/EdTech offered workshops

 Complete 6 sessions before June 2019 and receive a certificate of completion in Teaching Innovation at a celebratory luncheon.

 Register for sessions at: https://iweb.langara.bc.ca/tcdc/calendar/

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Langaran’s Exploring Pedagogy -Registration Open Now

Registration Open Now for the next session of Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar!

If you are an experienced Langara instructor interested in exploring the practice of teaching and in reflecting deeply on your own pedagogy, then Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar will be of interest to you.

The Advanced Teaching Seminar (ATS) was piloted through 2015-17 as an initiative of the Learning and Teaching APAG. It will be hosted this year by TCDC and is now seeking interested faculty.

What are the benefits? What will you gain by joining the ATS? Here is one participant’s personal reflection:

Since the completion of the Advanced Teaching Seminar (ATS) I have felt an increased sense of confidence with teaching. Steve made space for each participant to reflect, discuss, and engage in a way that was meaningful to them. This provided opportunities for deep and substantial learning. I was able to understand and embrace the messiness of teaching. Particularly that as teachers of adults we do not have to have all the answers, and that we are on our own journey of discovery.

Here is a poem written about my experience

I’ve been invited, but feel unworthy
Reading Brookfield and struggling with understanding Telos
I walk back into my teaching role
Encouraged to write stories of success – or failure

My story of exhaustion and sisterly love supports reflection
I see the value in what I do, and how I do it
Reading Brookfield and struggling with understanding Telos
I walk back into my teaching role

Confident in my abilities, confident in my title of experienced teacher
Encouraged to write stories of success – or failure
Willing to reflect and share expertise
I see the value in what I do, and how I do it

I’ve been invited, but feel unworthy
My story of exhaustion and sisterly love enables reflection
I see the value in what I do, and how I do it
Willing to reflect and share expertise

Denise Pawliuk
Instructor – Langara Early Childhood Education

Facilitated by retired Langara instructor Steve Musson, the ATS involves on-line and face to face components. The ATS will meet for four 3-hour face-to-face sessions (2 mornings during December exam period and 2 mornings during April exam period). On-line participation will be interspersed around the face-to-face sessions.

For more information about the Advanced Teaching Seminar, email Carolyn Wing, Educational Development Coordinator in TCDC (tcdc@langara.ca).

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TCDC Book Club: How Learning Works

Ever wondered how students’ prior knowledge (or misunderstandings) and the ways they organize new information impact their learning? Curious about what factors motivate students to learn? Want to know more about which types of practice and feedback actually enhance learning, or how you can help your students become self-directed learners?

How Learning Works by Ambrose, Bridges, DiPietro, Lovett and Norman explores recent research from the learning sciences to answer these and other learning-related questions. Join the TCDC book club this fall to read about and discuss a variety of research-based teaching principles and practical, straight-forward strategies for improving student learning.

This book club will be facilitated by a TCDC curriculum consultant and discussions will focus on ways participants might implement some of the strategies outlined in the book into their own courses. We hope you’ll join us this fall for thought-provoking reading, delicious snacks, and great conversation about teaching and learning.

NOTE: The TCDC library has a few copies of this book that can be borrowed by book club participants.

 

Book Club Meeting Schedule

Wed. Oct. 3
5:30-6:30
Chapter 1: How does students’ prior knowledge affect their learning?
Wed. Oct. 10
4:30-5:30
Chapter 2: How does the way students organize knowledge affect their learning?
Wed. Oct. 17
4:30-5:30
Chapter 3: What factors motivate students to learn?
Wed. Oct. 24
4:30-5:30
Chapter 4: How do students develop mastery?
Wed. Oct. 31
4:30-5:30
Chapter 5: What kinds of practice and feedback enhance learning?
Wed. Nov. 7
4:30-5:30
Chapter 6: Why do student development and course climate matter for student learning?
Wed. Nov. 14
4:30-5:30
Chapter 7: How to students become self-directed learners?

 

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Langarans Exploring Pedagogy – Melissa’s Mea Culpa

Langarans Reflect on Pedagogy

In Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar, Langara instructors write a fictional story in the first person, highlighting, “some kind of ‘problem’, or challenge, or dilemma, or puzzlement” they have experienced in their teaching practice. The “story will, at some level, be a partial description of the landscape of good teaching (even if the teaching in the story itself isn’t – on the face of it – seen as ‘good’). A story is a snapshot of what good-and-improving teachers sometimes experience in their practice.” Woven informally into each story are the concepts and phrases pulled from various assigned course readings (see references).

For more information about the Advanced Teaching Seminar or to inquire about registering, e-mail Carolyn Wing, Educational Development Coordinator at TCDC (tcdc@langara.ca).

               Melissa’s Mea Culpa

In the summer of 2017 I was given the opportunity to return to SFU and teach one of my most favourite classes – CRIM 315: Restorative Justice. First, a bit of history. This course was taught to me in my undergrad by an amazing professor who gave me the opportunity to connect my head to my heart, to explore intellectual honesty, exemplified “walking her talk”, and who was teaching about being vulnerable (CoP Document) before Brene Brown made it famous. The late Dr. Elizabeth (Liz) Elliott taught with her full heart and through her story-telling (Course Description), created a safe space for students to explore the intricacies of an incredibly complex justice system.

I then moved on to graduate school and under Liz’s supervision, became one of the teaching assistants for restorative justice. On two separate occasions, I stepped in to teach for Liz when she was diagnosed (and then re-diagnosed) with cancer. Both times I was filled with fear of being able to live up to Liz’s reputation and hoped that my passion and excitement for the material would outshine my relative inexperience in teaching. This was most certainly a steep learning curve, but a valuable one.

Fast-forward to the May 2017. I have the chance to teach CRIM 315 back at SFU, in the same lecture theatre that I took the same class from Liz waaaaay back in my undergrad. The giant lecture theatre of 100 students concerned me with regard to my ability to connect with the students in a meaningful way, after teaching for several years in classrooms of 40 students at Langara. What worried me most is that my connection to the course (and Liz) is very emotional and I was struggling to find a way share this in my lecture while still having a clear sense of purpose (Brookfield Excerpts) and an organizing vision of where [I was] going and why [I was] going there (Brookfield Excerpts). I wanted the students to FEEL the material and the importance of reconnecting to people through our shared humanity (something that is lost in our systems of justice in most places around the world). Through my personal experiences and stories, Liz’s examples, and the participation of students willing to tell their stories, we as a group, created a safe place for sharing and for learning (CoP Document). I’d like to say this was all part of a master plan and that I created this space with intention, but it largely grew out of a massive error in judgement on my part.

In the first few weeks of the course, we tackle the history of the western justice process and we spend time discussing what “we” can learn from traditional societies (defined as societies that existed prior to the imposition of centralized government and justice), and Indigenous peoples throughout history and in modern times. We then shift our focus to the damage done by colonization and how different notions of justice (and more generally, how we defined acceptable or “proper” Canadians) effectively destroyed generations of indigenous peoples, their communities, languages, and cultures. As part of this discussion, I showed the film “We were Children” to the class. For those who have not seen it, the film tells the story of residential schools from the perspective of two survivors. I told the students before showing the film what the film was about and we watched the film. Afterward the film ended and I turned the lights back on in the lecture theatre, I looked up at the students and knew that something was very wrong. I guess this is what it feels like when my teaching fails (Bain Excerpts). I looked into their eyes and at their faces and saw horror, sadness, and anger. It was one of the first times in my teaching experiences that I knew the looks on their faces was my fault. As someone who, in restorative justice, teaches that justice processes should do no further harm and I had done the complete opposite in this situation. Teachers [should not] do their students (or anyone else) any harm in the process (Bain Excerpts). I opened a discussion with the class. I could see no one wanted or felt comfortable engaging, so I ended class.

As I walked from the lecture theatre to the classroom where my tutorial was held, I reflected upon what had happened and that for one of the first times, I felt that I failed my students. My tutorial consisted of 16 students from the larger lecture, giving us an opportunity to talk in a smaller group. This group had bonded fairly quickly and as we sat in circle that day my students began to talk about what had happened in class. They felt unprepared to see and hear the stories of the two residential school survivors. They felt uneducated. Although they had learned about residential schools, the horrific experiences of the children became real in seeing this film. It wasn’t just an account of history in a textbook anymore. It was the power of the circle, like sitting around the campfire (Telos Document), that allowed me to realize that I took for granted that everyone had the same level of education and understanding about residential schools. It was also the place where I was humbled by my students’ willingness to be open about their feelings and be honest about what was working and what wasn’t.

I felt it was important to address the remainder of the students and I wasn’t willing to leave these conversations in other tutorials to my teaching assistants. In our next week’s class, I stood in front of all of the students, feeling very vulnerable, and began with a heartfelt apology explaining that I felt that I had did not adequately prepare them for the film. This was a deeply emotional process (Brookfield Excerpts). I then opened the room up to a discussion through what I call the opening round. We passed around a talking piece and everyone was given the space to say what they needed to say or pass if they felt they needed to pass. And with 100 students, this took most of the class. The organized, stickler-to-the-schedule teacher in me began to panic that I would be a week behind, but I knew this time was needed. In the weeks that followed, I heard from numerous students that our discussion in the week after the film was one of the most honest that they’d experienced in university.

The semester ticked along and it ended up being an amazing class. The learning that came out of this incident was monumental. I learned not to assume that everyone comes to class with the same knowledge, experience, and understanding. Most of all, throughout this, I thought what would Liz have done? I’m sure she made her fair share of mistakes in her teaching career, but I never saw them. But I knew what she would say to me. I could hear her voice. She would say, “Melissa, no one is perfect. Not you, not me. We all make mistakes, but it’s how we rise after we fall. Dust yourself off and get back at it.” Made me think about the gladiator in the arena from Roosevelt’s Arena.

~This story was written by Melissa Roberts, Department Chair and Instructor in Langara’s Criminal Justice Department

References

  • The Skillful Teacher( Brookfield, 1990)
  • The Courage to Teach (Palmer,1998)
  • What the Best College Teachers Do (Bain, 2004)
  • Excerpt from Theodore Roosevelt’s speech “Citizenship In A Republic” delivered at the Sorbonne, in Paris, France on 23 April, 1910
  • Action Theory: Increasing Professional Effectiveness in College Teaching (Musson,2015)
  • A Community of Practice And Your Professional Development (Musson, 2015)
  • Of Telos, Teaching, and Great Things (Musson, 2015, 2017)
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Evening Fall Langara Instructional Skills Workshop

An evening Fall Langara College ISW will be held on six consecutive Tuesday evenings (approx. 5:30-8:30pm) Sept 11, 18, 25,Oct 2, 9, 16, 2018.

Interested in ISW but can’t make this session? Contact Carolyn Wing tcdc@langara.ca for possible alternatives.
ISW is Your Opportunity to Enhance or Improve Your Teaching!

  • Teach more interactive and interesting classes
  • Increase your competence and confidence in the classroom
  • Expand your teaching techniques and strategies
  • Enhance your feedback and evaluative skills
  • Receive a certificate recognized across North America
  • Open to Langara employees only

These workshops fill quickly and have a maximum number of 12-16 participants, so don’t delay.

To register please contact:
Carolyn Wing, Educational Development Coordinator
Teaching and Curriculum Development Centre (TCDC)
tcdc@langara.ca

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Langaran’s Exploring Pedagogy -My Telos Meets Another Tribe

Langarans Reflect on Pedagogy

In Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar, Langara instructors write a fictional story in the first person, highlighting, “some kind of ‘problem’, or challenge, or dilemma, or puzzlement” they have experienced in their teaching practice. The “story will, at some level, be a partial description of the landscape of good teaching (even if the teaching in the story itself isn’t – on the face of it – seen as ‘good’). A story is a snapshot of what good-and-improving teachers sometimes experience in their practice.” Woven informally into each story are the concepts and phrases pulled from various assigned course readings (see references).
For more information about the Advanced Teaching Seminar or to inquire about registering, e-mail Carolyn Wing, Educational Development Coordinator at TCDC (tcdc@langara.ca).

Every Discipline had a Telos. 

Continue reading

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Making Sense of Open Education – cross Canada mini-MOOC

From June 1-15, 2018, a cross-Canada mini-MOOC (massive open online course) called Making Sense of Open Education will take place through the OpenLearn UK Moodle platform. The course will consist of short daily lessons and activities at an introductory level. The purpose of the course is to increase awareness and use of open educational resources (OER) as part of post-secondary teaching and learning in Canada.

Topics will include OER, open educational practices (OEP), copyright and the Creative Commons licenses, and open tools for adaptation. A variety of experienced open educators, and friends from global regions will participate and support learning and sharing opportunities.

Daily lessons will take approximately 30 minutes to complete with a targeted (and hopefully fun) daily practice opportunity to apply what you are learning. The course team and others that have already signed up look forward to your participation.

There is no cost to participate in the course. The full set of course modules will be made available on the course front page June 1 for you to download, save, and adapt as you desire if you prefer to take the course in a self-directed way.

Questions? Please contact Jenni via email: jhayman@ecampusontario.ca

Registration is Open at the Following Link: https://bit.ly/2EV3FHV

Jenni Hayman
Program Manager
eCampusOntario
226.500.0845

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August Instructional Skills Workshop

The next Langara College ISW will be held on three consecutive days (8:30am-4:30pm) August 28, 29, 30, 2018.

Interested in ISW but can’t make this session? Contact Carolyn Wing tcdc@langara.ca for possible alternatives.FYI an evening or weekend ISW is being considered for Fall 2018. If this would suit your schedule, please let us know.

ISW is Your Opportunity to Enhance or Improve Your Teaching!

  • Teach more interactive and interesting classes
  • Increase your competence and confidence in the classroom
  • Expand your teaching techniques and strategies
  • Enhance your feedback and evaluative skills
  • Receive a certificate recognized across North America
  • Open to Langara employees only

These workshops fill quickly and have a maximum number of 12-16 participants, so don’t delay.

To register please contact:
Carolyn Wing, Educational Development Coordinator
Teaching and Curriculum Development Centre (TCDC)
tcdc@langara.ca

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Langaran’s Exploring Pedagogy – CSI Style

In Langara’s Advanced Teaching Seminar, Langara instructors write a fictional story in the first person, highlighting, “some kind of ‘problem’, or challenge, or dilemma, or puzzlement”[1] they have experienced in their teaching practice. The “story will, at some level, be a partial description of the landscape of good teaching (even if the teaching in the story itself isn’t – on the face of it – seen as ‘good’).  A story is a snapshot of what good-and-improving teachers sometimes experience in their practice.”[2] Woven informally into each story are the concepts and phrases pulled from various assigned course readings (see references). 

For more information about the Advanced Teaching Seminar or to inquire about registering, e-mail Carolyn Wing, Educational Development Coordinator at TCDC (tcdc@langara.ca).

[1] Musson, 2017.
[2] Musson, 2017.

Our first submission: Richard’s CSI Story…….

Continue reading

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Indigenizing Post-Secondary Education

Join us for a morning of insight on the theme of Indigenizing post-secondary education nationally and locally. Hear from keynote speaker Dr. Shelly Johnson (Mukwa Musayett), Canada Research Chair in Indigenizing Higher Education; presenters Dianne Biin (Camosun College, BCcampus) and Michelle Glubke (BCcampus); and Dr. Bruce Miller (Sociocultural Anthropology, UBC).

Presented by Indigenous Education & Services and in partnership with the Langara College Teaching and Curriculum Development Centre.

Thursday, May 10, 2018
9:00 am–12:00 pm
T Building Gallery

Agenda

9:00 am–10:30 am | Keynote with Dr. Shelly Johnson
10:30 am–11:30 am | Sharing the BC OER Pulling Together with Dianne Biin and Michelle Glubke
11:30 am–12:00 pm | Responsible Research Relationships with Dr. Bruce Miller

RSVP to this event.

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Bridging Indigenous Ways of Knowing with Western Ways of Doing Research – Event at Science World

Bridging Indigenous Ways of Knowing with Western Ways of Doing Research

This panel discussion will aim to bridge Western ways of knowing with Indigenous ways of knowing and will be open to a wider audience interested in science as well as visiting students, SBQMI faculty, staff, and students. The moderator of the panel will be Dr. Sam Rocha, Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Education at the Faculty of Education at UBC. Dr. Rocha’s research interests include, among others, the philosophy of race and education as well as higher education and leadership.

WWEST is partially funding this as a part of our Funding Partners Program.

Date: April 9, Time: 3:00pm-5:00pm
Cost: Free.
Location: Science World at TELUS World of Science
1455 Quebec Street
Vancouver, BC V6A 3Z7
Register: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/bridging-indigenous-ways-of-knowing-with-western-ways-of-doing-research-tickets-44202459747

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What cognitive level do your exams target?

by Kristie Dukewich & Carmen Larsen, Curriculum Consultants at TCDC
Hand completing a multiple choice exam.

Exam by Alberto G.

Before I taught my first course, I thought that preparing an exam for students was going to be easier than preparing a class lecture. I expected that exam week was going to be my easiest week in terms of course prep. I did not expect that I’d have to develop a whole new set of skills related to designing assessment. So much for expectations.

Designing effective exams has turned out to be much more complicated and time-consuming than I first imagined. There are so many variables to consider in designing an effective exam, including:

  • writing questions that are clear and concise using simple, accessible language
  • selecting specific topics to assess (and deciding which topics can be left out)
  • assessing a range of cognitive complexities

One of the aspects of exam design that I have wrestled with a lot over the years is cognitive complexity. How do I write exam questions that are challenging to students, but not too challenging? How can I assess higher-order thinking without destroying students’ confidence and motivation with overly-difficult questions?

___________________________________________________

Are you interested in learning more about designing exams and evaluating their effectiveness? Sign-up for our workshop.

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Learning taxonomies can be incredibly valuable for helping us think about the issue of cognitive complexity in assessments. A variety of learning taxonomies have been developed that attempt to categorize levels of knowledge and/or ability. Bloom’s Taxonomy (see Krathwohl, 2002 for an overview) is probably the most well-known. It identifies a range of learner skills and abilities that are anchored by a foundation of basic knowledge of a topic. The model is hierarchical, with the level of understanding (or cognitive processing) becoming increasingly complex as we move through the 6 stages from the basic ability to recall information to the ability to analyze and evaluate it and then finally using it to create something new. This taxonomy can be very helpful when considering the types of questions we will use in our exams.

Bloom's Taxonomy Pyramid

Bloom’s Taxonomy by Center for Teaching Vanderbilt University CC2.0

However, one of the problems with Bloom’s Taxonomy is that it implies the development Continue reading

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Reflections of an Emergency Hire

Emily Gawlick-Mlieczko, Executive Director of Early Childhood Educators of BC (ECEBC), was a recent emergency hire in Langara’s Early Childhood Education Program.

Finding Inspiration When You Didn’t Know You Were Looking for It

The most amazing thing happened to me this past summer, something that confirmed the career choice I made. Don’t get me wrong—I am continually in awe and inspired by the people I meet daily through my work with ECEBC. But this was different, something I needed and I didn’t even realize it at the time.

This past summer I was hired by Langara College to teach two courses and supervise practicums. Talk about being thrown out of my comfort zone! I am used to being the student, not the instructor, and there were so many new things to learn: creating lesson plans, lectures, and assignments; meeting new colleagues; and remember­ing all the new student names. It honestly felt like the first week of September in child care with all the new faces and anticipation.

Very quickly it became evident that this opportunity was a gift, an inspiration. It had been so long since I had been able to tap into discussions about the practice of early childhood education at such a deep level (with the exception of the ECE geek dinners I have with some close friends in Victoria). Since becoming the executive di­rector of ECEBC, the opportunity to engage with the practice of early education has not been the same as when I was an early childhood educator myself. As executive director I am involved in high-level policy research and speaking on behalf of early childhood educators rather than working directly with children and families, which is something I thought I would always be doing. Truth be told, sometimes I would feel wounded that I might only be seen in this one role, as I have identified for so long as an educator.

So as soon as I entered that first day of classes, I was amazed. The conversations were inspiring, with the students engaging in some very difficult topics. They spoke from the heart, and their curiosity was uplifting. I was able to witness them learning new skills, applying them, and then reflecting. We talked about our values and beliefs and how eth­ics guide our practice. The students were open to being challenged and to challenge me back. I felt as we were on the journey of learning and reflection together.

This experience afforded me the luxury of visiting many child care centres in the Lower Mainland that I had not before. All had their own unique philosophy and energy.

During this process it was surprising how so many real-life experiences with children and families came flooding back. Those times were some of the best ever as I learned so much from the families and I grew in my practice through the guidance of my co-workers. The families taught me how to be a true advocate for children.

Other inspiration came to me from the support I received from my team of ECEBC staff and board of directors. They would ask many questions about the topics the class was discussing, and they would give me additional insight. At home, my life became even busier, as I still maintained the full-time position at ECEBC. My son Alex, daughter-in-law Amanda, and son James were extremely helpful with D2L, uploading documents and assignments. They helped me stay organized. No small feat if you know me at all.

The energy and fresh perspectives reminded me of the importance of having a strong and highly educated profession and post-secondary education system for ECE that is supported both at an institution level and government-policy level.

I will be forever grateful for this op­portunity that the Langara College faculty gave me. I was welcomed into their family and culture; they included me in rich conversations, shared their knowledge, and gave me guidance and support.

This experience reaffirmed that no matter what role I take on, I always will be an early childhood educa­tor. Thanks for the inspiration—I needed it.

Emily Gawlick-Mlieczko is the Executive Director of ECEBC

This article was originally published in the Winter 2018 issue of The Early Childhood Educator, ECEBC’s journal.

 

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Film Night- Highway of Tears

Snəw̓eyəɬ leləm̓ (Langara College) Gathering Space and the Department of Sociology & Anthropology present the award-winning documentary, Highway of Tears.

Please see the poster below for more details

 

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Langara Book Club: The Book of Negroes

Book of Negroes coverIn anticipation of Lawrence Hill’s keynote at the 2018 Langara Academic Plan Mini-Conference, join members of the Langara community for a series of stimulating discussions about Hill’s award-winning 2007 novel, The Book of Negroes. Meet Hill’s unforgettable heroine, Aminita Diallo, and journey with her across continents, through slavery to freedom in a novel that The Globe and Mail has called “a masterpiece.” Whether you read the novel years ago or are discovering it for the first time, you are invited to take part in informal, stimulating discussions facilitated by Langara faculty from the English and Library departments.

The first 5 participants to sign up for any one of the sessions (Feb, March or April) will receive a free copy of The Book of Negroes.

Light refreshments will be provided.

Registration: https://iweb.langara.bc.ca/tcdc/calendar/ or https://iweb.langara.bc.ca/tcdc/sign-up/

February 26th session facilitated by Kathleen Oliver of Langara’s English Department and Alli Sullivan from Langara’s Library.

March 26t  session facilitated by Deborah Blacklock and Alexander Grammatikos from Langara’s English Department.

April 19th session facilitated by Kina Cavicchioli and Deborah Blacklock from Langara’s English Department.

 

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